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  • Whistler Hiking Gear Rental
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  • Whistler Hiking Gear Rental
  • Whistler Hiking Gear Rental
  • Whistler Hiking Gear Rental
  • Whistler Hiking Gear Rental
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Aerial Views of Whistler

Brandywine Falls Aerial Video - Whistler TrailsMadeley Lake Aerial Video - Whistler TrailsPanorama Ridge Aerial Video - Whistler Trails

Joffre Lakes, just over an hours drive north of Whistler is a paradise in the mountains.  Glaciers on cliffs above, rushing river beside you, and the mesmerizingly beautiful Joffre Lake below you.  Keyhole Falls is a stunning waterfall at the centre of a massive construction project 2 hours from Whistler.

Joffre Lakes Aerial ViewJoffre Lakes is one of the most beautiful lakes you are likely to ever see.  There are three lakes and they get progressively more beautiful.  By the third lake the intense blue is breathtaking.  The mighty Matier Glacier rises above the third lake, making the experience even more spectacular.  The trail is rough and tricky in some parts, but not terribly difficult.  The trail is 5.5k to the third lake so give yourself 1.5 - 2 hours(one way).  Lots of trail construction work is being done as a new trail replaces much of the old trail.  The old boulder section between the lower and middle lakes has now been covered with a new dirt trail.  Joffre Lakes Provincial Park is centred around the three Joffre Lakes.  All of them are beautiful on their own and each more beautiful than the last.  Frozen over in the winter, you won't be able to marvel at the amazing turquoise colours the lakes, caused by light reflecting off of the particles of glacial silt suspended in the water.  In the winter, with the lakes frozen and the trees weighed down with snow, Joffre Lakes takes on a serene beauty, with the low sun cutting through the trees and the forest brightly reflecting.  The third Joffre Lake ends in a U-shaped valley where you will find the far side of the lake towering with glaciers relentlessly crushing down on the lake.

Joffre Lakes Aerial View 3

At Upper Joffre Lake, there are several nice, though rugged places to camp.  In a hilly, lightly forested section of paradise in between the impossibly turquoise Joffre Lake and the abruptly monstrous Matier Glacier descending from Mount Matier beyond.  A waterfall cascades near the camping area.  The campsite has one nice and well maintained outhouse.

Joffre Lakes Aerial Video 2

The Joffre Lakes trail is surprisingly busy most of the summer, which is a testament to how extraordinarily beautiful, and relatively easy the hike is.  Unlike Wedgemount Lake, Black Tusk or Cirque Lake, which are to difficult for many hikers, Joffre Lakes is comparatively easy and certainly relaxing.  Many hikes in the nearby Garibaldi Park are not family friendly and easy, but Joffre Lakes is.  Certainly the scenic drive to the trailhead from Whistler is part of the fun.

More Aerial Views and Hiking Info for Joffre Lakes Provincial Park >>

Decades ago a train derailed south of Whistler.  The cost to clean up the mess was evidently deemed too high, so seven train cars were left scattered next to the Cheakamus River.  As it turns out, time Whistler Train Wreck Aerial View of Cheakamus Riverand local effort has transformed this mess into a wonderful work of art, an extraordinary bike park, and a great place to hike.  The Whistler Train Wreck. Cheakamus River winds its way, crashing and emerald green along the length of the Whistler Train Wreck, and there are several spectacular river vantage points that shouldn't be missed.  The whole length of the train wreck and Cheakamus River hike is 3 kilometres (each way) and the trails go along the beautiful river as well as several, widely spaced train wrecks.

To get to the trailhead for Whistler Train Wreck, drive 7.6k south of Whistler Village.  At the traffic lights at Function Junction turn left onto Cheakamus Lake Rd, then immediately left again in the the huge parking lot for the Cheakamus Community Forest(aka Interpretive Forest).  Park here then walk or bike to the Flank Trail trailhead that almost immediately branches off to the Train Wreck Trail(see the maps below).  The mostly unmarked Train Wreck trail is tricky to find and follow.

Whistler Train Wreck Aerial Video of the Wrecks

Whistler Train Wreck Highway Underpass(the wrong way)About 40 metres from the tiny Flank Trail sign off of Alpha Lake Rd you will spot the large, old sign indicating Flank Trail to the right and another, unmarked trail heading left.  Walk a down this unmarked trail with the creek still on your left and you will pass some ancient, but weirdly idyllic picnic tables.  Further along you will come out to a clearing and see two painted boulders on your left on either side of a trail.  If you miss this trail you will come to the water tunnel under the highway(video above/right, this is the wrong way).

The trail to Whistler Train Wreck is the one between the painted Whistler Train Wreck Sea to Sky Highway Underpassboulders.  Continue along this trail through the forest for a couple minutes and you will come out to a wall of boulders with the Sea to Sky Highway far above.  Follow the trail to the left here and you will pass under the highway with beautiful graffiti on either side of the river(see the video to the left here).

From here the trail is fairly straight forward, but keep in mind that you should, and easily can keep clear of the train tracks with the exception of crossing them once.  There is a bright blue spray painted line on the tracks at the one place you need to cross.  Avoid being on or near the train tracks as much as possible and if a train comes, be sure to not be seen.  Having people in the vicinity of the train tracks understandably alarms the train conductors and they will notify BC Rail staff to come down and issue fines if they see people walking on their tracks.

Whistler Train Wreck - Trail Map

Free parking can be found at the Cheakamus Community Forest parking lot just a short walk away from the Train Wreck/Flank Trail trailhead.

Whistler Train Wreck - Driving Direction Map

More Aerial Views and Hiking Info for Whistler Train Wreck >>

Keyhole Hot Springs(sometimes called Pebble Creek Hot Springs) is located 100 kilometres from Whistler(Village Gate Blvd).  Though most of the 100k is on logging roads, it is drivable by most cars without any trouble.  The massive Innergex hydroelectric project is well underway in the area, turning a once quiet wilderness into a Keyhole Hot Springs and Upper Lillooet Riverwar-zone.  On the plus side, the old logging roads near Keyhole Hot Springs are now well maintained and smooth.  2014 saw the permanent closing of the old hot springs trail and a new trail built.  The Lillooet River Trail, with its own trailhead parking, small sign and permanent outhouse, now marks the start of the route to Keyhole Hot Springs.  The new trail is 2 kilometres long and moderately challenging as it skirts the rugged terrains along the Upper Lillooet River.  There are at least two amazing areas along the trail perfect for camping along the river.  The trail is well marked with flagging tape and tree reflectors as well as the occasional bench to sit on.  The trail, at a moderate pace should take about a half an hour from your car to the springs.  If you have any interest in geology, however, the trail may take you hours.  The crumbing cliffs reveal an astounding array of recent volcanic activity and you find yourself staring in amazement at the extraordinarily strange rocks.

Aerial Video of Keyhole Falls and Keyhole Hot Springs

The hot springs at Keyhole flow out of the ground adjacent to the swirling, crashing and wonderfully glacier coloured water of the Lillooet River.  The colour varies with the season, but for the most part it is a wonderful, milky turquoise.  When the sunlight penetrates the deep valley, the milky turquoise changes to a wonderful, emerald green colour as it swirls around you.

More Aerial Views and Hiking Info for Keyhole Falls and Hot Springs >>

Stanley Park in downtown Vancouver is a beautiful and astoundingly huge network of hiking/walking/biking trails.  An estimated 8 million hikers, walkers, rollerbladers and cyclists visit the park yearly.  The wonderful spider web of trails throughout the park add up to a staggering 200 kilometres, which explains how the park generally feels serene and relatively quiet most days despite its phenomenal popularity.  Stanley Park can be walked or biked in any number of routes and lengths.  Certainly one of the popular, and most straight forward routes is by a large, 10k circle, paved trail that runs around the perimeter.  You can park at one end, for example near English Bay, and head along the coastal, paved trail and follow the beautiful circumference of Stanley Park and return to where you started after a wonderful and constantly scenic 10k seawall route.  The interior trails wind their way through the unexpectedly huge trees within Stanley Park.  Some trees stand over 70 metres (249 ft) and are centuries old.  The more impressive trees include Douglas-fir, Western Red Cedar, Western Hemlock and Sitka Spruce.  The trees are numerous and the forest so thick that you would certainly get lost if not for the excellent and well organized trail layout in the park.

Stanley Park Aerial View of Vancouver

The park has frequent concession stands, washrooms and points of interest.  Stanley Park is also the home of the Vancouver Aquarium, with its considerable array of marine life, from penguins to Beluga whales.  Stanley Park is not so much a hike as an amazing walk, but certainly a must see in Vancouver.  It definitely is the most convenient and scenic.  If you are entering Vancouver from Lions Gate Bridge, you will notice just as you leave the bridge you will see a turn lane and road entering the park on your right.  This takes you to Prospect Point(pictured above).  This is a wonderful way to start your tour of the park.

Stanley Park Aerial View

From Prospect Point, Stanley Park Road continues through the park with the next parking area being on your left for the Hollow Tree.  Definitely worth a look, this massive, now hollow tree has quite an interesting history, depicted on pictures and murals near it.  The next parking area is for Third Beach where you will find concessions, washrooms and stairs to this remote feeling and often very lively beach.

More Aerial Views and Info for Stanley Park in Vancouver >>

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Squamish Trails - Sea to SkyVictoria TrailsVancouver Hiking Trails - Stanley Park